Polly

Writings and Witterings


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Six foot four – Sunflower

Napowrimo said: in honour of Earth Day, on Day 22, write a poem about a plant. ‘Flowers, of course, have been the subject of poems since time immemorial, and continue to be a source of much inspiration’.

I am up-to-date!  Yay :)

Six foot four – Sunflower
What could be
More
Outrageous
Than
A six foot four
Sunflower?
Native
Of the Americas.

Perhaps …
10 tonnes of Ai Weiwei’s
Famous porcelain sunflower seeds!
10 tonnes,
A 10th of those
Covering
Tate Modern’s
Turbine Hall.

The perfect sunshine
Yellow, fiery and proud,
Stunning spirals
Typically loud,
Typically
Times thirty-four inside,
Fifty-five outside,
Spirals.

Helianthus annuus
For birds,
For bread, medicine,
Dyes, body paints,
Sunflower oil,
Livestock feed, latex,
Yes, latex
Six foot four!

Polly Robinson © 2012


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Blood Diamonds

Nearly there … just this one and Day 22 to complete and I’m up-to-date!  Day 29 and I cannot find a prompt from napowrimo – oh no!  I’ll have to come up with something myself *racks brain* … OK, I have it … hope you think so too.

Blood Diamonds

November 2000 and police intercept a gang
Who plan to smash into the Millennium Dome,
To steal diamonds worth a mere
£200 million.

They intend to escape in a speedboat
On the Thames, like a James Bond film!
Conflict diamonds, synthetic diamonds,

Blood diamonds.
The monopoly is threatened.
Hidden hoarders of diamonds are scared.
Vast, is the hoard of secret diamonds,

Worth billions, yes billions.
A fall in the value of diamonds?
A catastrophe!
Ah, but we love diamonds, because they are
Expensive.

They are, (and we all know this),
Quite simply, a girl’s
Best
Friend.

Marilyn sang the famous song
About it
So …
It must be true …

And yet, the sadness of
Pain, politics and cruelty
Encrusts blood diamonds.

Polly Robinson © 2012

The Millennium Dome, London, UK


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The Final Frontier

Napowrimo’s prompt for Day 28.  ‘In 1958, Gaston Bachelard published The Poetics of Space. In some ways, it was a book about architecture.  But Bachelard’s book wasn’t about angles and sight lines and how to make sure your roof stays on straight.  It was about the experience of spaces, their psychological and perceptive implications’.

I am using poetic licence with this one, since nothing made me want to write about ‘the high vaulted ceilings of the cathedral, the low, cozy beamed roof of the cottage. Drawers, closets, the insides of seashells … A box that opens, a box that closes — the sense of space revealed and concealed …’ even though all are fascinating and, on another day, in another frame of mind, these things would get me going … but not today.  So today, space for me is about the final frontier.  I hope you like it.

At the 2012 Space Foundation Student Art Contest, Raquel Arens won 2nd place in the 6th-8th grade Painting category. The judges also awarded Raquel the Space Foundation Achievement Award.

The Final Frontier

Explore the planets, black holes and more,
Space is within and outside the door,
Investigate stars and space,
Keep on par, in pace
With the latest discoveries,
Beneaths and aboveries.
Space where e’er we go.
The biosphere the surface,
The biomass lurking below.

Polly Robinson © 2012


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House of Beauty

And our prompt for napowrimo Day 16 is based on the idea of a picture being worth a thousand words — napowrimo posted three pictures, all loosely based around the idea of the ocean, the sea snail was the one that I picked to inspire the following poem.

House of Beauty

A house of beauty

You carry fathoms deep

Tucked in amongst flotsam and jetsam

Aqualine iced blues merge to grazing greens

Whilst your sluggy mollusc body leaves a trail unseen

Below the choppy waves

Polly Robinson © 2012


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To British Weather

A palm tree seen through many raindrops.

The prompt for Day 17 from napowrimo was to write an epistolary poem — a poem in the form of a letter.

‘… include at least 4 of the below in your poem:

1) a song lyric
2) a historical fact
3) an oddball adjective-noun combination (like red grass or loud silence)
4) a fruit
5) the name of a street in your neighbourhood
6) a measure of distance.’

Quite a challenge, I felt.  Here is my response:

To British Weather

Today you are for me
And against me.
Raindrops keep falling on my head
You invite me to catch up
With things I
Should have done
Or
Could have done
But
Didn’t do.

An interruption, intrusion!
An amazing fact is that
Animals can
Rain from the sky,
Don’t ask me why,
I looked it up
To satisfy
A requirement,
A demand,
For a poetic challenge.

Another!
One hundred yards away
Is Crown East Lane,
Where you can buy
Soft, hand-made, fragrant leather gloves
Near the Church of St Thomas.
Here, at harvest time,
The children bring baskets of
Apples, pears,
Plums and damsons.

Anyway, weather,
Where were we
Before I so
Rudely interrupted me?
Oh yes, catching up with
The things
I should have,
Could have,
And didn’t
Do.

No chance of
Gardening,
Don’t want to
Get drowned.
You are for me
Drowning
In words,
You are
Against me
Gardening.

I listen and hear,
Raindrops keep falling on my head
Dribbling, scribbling
On the windows
Dripping, gripping
The brickwork,
Soaking, cloaking
The wooden, now wet and dark,
Garage door.
And inhale the freshness of moist drops – the scent of rain.

Polly Robinson © 2012


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Lullaby

Day 18 – write a lullaby

Catching up nicely now!  This will teach me to fall behind – an epic poetry writing day :)

Lullaby

Listen to mama, shhhh, shhhh,
Loving you so,
Close your eyes, shhhh, shhhh,
To beddlums you go.

Into your dreams, shhhh, shhhh,
Quiet and near,
Slumber so close, shhhh, shhhh,
Soft voice in your ear.

My hand strokes your brow, shhhh, shhhh,
Child of mine,
Your scent fills me up, shhhh, shhhh,
My babe so fine.

Listen to mama, shhhh, shhhh,
Loving you so,
Close your eyes, shhhh, shhhh,
To beddlums you go.

Polly Robinson © 2012

Cradle Chair


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Despair

‘Do you remember “Opposite Day”?’ we were asked on Day 19, ‘… this was an irregularly declared day (usually Wednesdays … but not every Wednesday) in which statements were supposed to mean the opposite of what they usually do. … take a poem that already exists … and rewrite it so that each line is the opposite of the original’.

Hmmm, interesting, I must have led a sheltered life … I’ve never heard of ‘Opposite Day’.  I’ve chosen Emily Dickinson’s short poem Hope and almost feel I should apologise to her for making something so beautiful into something so desolate …

Despair

Despair is as nothing – bare

It lies on the heart –

Whispers of isolation, desolation and hopelessness –

It ceases – at death –

Polly Robinson © 2012