Polly

Writings and Witterings


47 Comments

This Morning

…there’s almost a hint
of autumn,
a mist of fresh
damply taste,
a touch
painting skin
with what’s to come.

Polly Robinson © 2014

A second offering for the dVerse ‘Let’s LIMBO’ prompt to write a line in forty words or fewer – I love short poems – this one has twenty words.


26 Comments

Moonlight In Jars

On the Malverns
under the stars
where faerie folk catch
moonlight in jars
for the jaded witch
along Shire Ditch
and only the brave
pass the giant’s cave
home

Polly Robinson © 2014

Moonlight in a jar - photo by www.etsy.com

Moonlight in a jar – photo by http://www.etsy.com


10 Comments

Flick The Vees

A bit of a ‘larf’ to the tune of ‘Ere We Go’ heh-heh :)

Flick The Vees

Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees.
Flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eees.
Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eeess, flick the vees.

Do it after you’ve shut the front door,
when he’s gone for a moan to his mother.
Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eeess, flick the vees.

Do it behind the back of the one
who is driving you to deep distraction.
Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eeess, flick the vees.

The emphasis placed on each flick
is what gives you the best satisfaction.
Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eeess, flick the vees.

Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees.
Flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eees.
Flick the vees, flick the vees, flick the vees,
flick the vee-eeess, flick the vees.

Polly Robinson © 2014


14 Comments

Night Walk on British Camp

With acknowledgement to sunset-british-camp-www.amazingview.co.uk

With acknowledgement to sunset-british-camp-www.amazingview.co.uk

Night Walk

In the depths of night the sky is sulky,
walkers set out for the brow of the hill.
Around British Camp and down, down Shire Ditch
where ill-willed faeries live, love, fly and dance.
They avoid Waum’s Cave for fear of the witch
who lives alone, low down deep, far away.

A crossroads appears, with pointing way stones,
to north, to south, to direct the unwary,
no one can vouchsafe their accuracy.
Do the walkers’ know it pays to be chary?
The ill-willed fae move the markers
so the wenders’ and walkers’ strong boots go astray.

The witch steps on twigs and rattles old leaves
and the sky darkens more, charcoals to grey,
turns to pitch black as torch batteries run out
the walkers now feeling, stealing their way
over hillocks and humps, bracken and bumps,
in the depths of the night at the end of the day.

Polly Robinson © 2014


44 Comments

Paradelle Of Prague

The wonderful city of Prague in the spring

The wonderful city of Prague in the spring – with acknowledgement to http://www.pragueproteinspring.org

 

Oh my…the things I do for dVerse and Brian Miller specifically…he’s challenged us to write a paradelle, so here’s my attempt.

Paradelle Of Prague

You will never visit Prague with me,
you will never visit Prague with me,
no matter what you do or how long you live,
no matter what you do or how long you live,
what you do – no matter – or how long you live,
Prague, you will never visit with me.

I have been to Spain with you,
I have been to Spain with you,
I have been in pain with you,
I have been in pain with you,
I have been to Spain in pain with you,
In pain I have been to Spain with you.

I went to Lanzarote with you,
I went to Lanzarote with you,
Lanzarote has a pretty Old Town
Lanzarote has a pretty Old Town
I went to Lanzarote.
Pretty was Lanzarote Old Town, with you.

I have been to Spain in pain with you,
In pain I have been to Spain with you.
I went to Lanzarote.
A pretty Old Town was Lanzarote, with you.
What you do – no matter – or how long you live,
You will never visit Prague with me.

Polly Robinson © 2014

Take a look at dVerse Poets Meeting The Bar – Form For All and join in!

Brian advised that the paradelle is a 4-stanza poem, where each stanza consists of 6 lines.

For the first 3 stanzas, the 1st and 2nd lines should be the same; the 3rd and 4th lines should also be the same; and the 5th and 6th lines should be composed of all the words from the 1st and 3rd lines and only the words from the 1st and 3rd lines.

The final stanza should be composed of all the words in the 5th and 6th lines of the first three stanzas and only the words from the 5th and 6th lines of the first three stanzas.

The paradelle is one of the more demanding French fixed forms, first appearing in the langue d’oc love poetry of the eleventh century. It is a poem of four six-line stanzas in which the first and second lines, as well as the third and fourth lines of the first three stanzas, must be identical. The fifth and sixth lines, which traditionally resolve these stanzas, must use all the words from the preceding lines and only those words. Similarly, the final stanza must use every word from all the preceding stanzas and only those words.


18 Comments

The Paper Maker

The Paper Maker with acknowledgement to www.theglasgowstory.com

The Paper Maker with
acknowledgement to http://www.theglasgowstory.com

Left, right,
quick march,
reams of paper,
white and starched.
Order restored,
all in place,
a gross for Mr Johnson
at the Poetry Place.

My name’s Charley,
Charley Waite,
‘course, they call me
Paper Waite
the bloody kids
who want a job,
all through the summer.

They should be me,
left school at fifteen,
did me no harm, as you can see.
Conscription stopped
in nineteen sixty:
the worst thing
for our kids.

Little shits,
graffiti-ing the mill.
I’ll give ‘em ‘summer job,’
they’ll get bugger all.
They’ll scrub
and clean
‘til those bricks
are pristine,
again.

Left, right,
quick march,
reams of paper,
white and starched.
Order restored,
all in place,
a gross for Miss Chard
at the Post Office.

Polly Robinson © 2014


46 Comments

Thanks

For dVerse and from an exercise in which the first line is selected from the work of another poet, comes ‘Thanks’.

Thanks

This is my second parking ticket since her affair;*
they belong to her,
I’ll send them with my thanks.

She will pay
in many ways,
as will he.

Polly Robinson © 2014

*From ‘Notice’ by Jackie Kay

For the dVerse ‘Let’s LIMBO’ prompt to write a line in forty words or fewer – mine has twenty-eight – have a go!